THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK

RESTORING PENICUIK’S LOST WALLED GARDEN & COMMUNITY FOOD PROJECT

An initiative of the Penicuik Community Development Trust

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THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK

FEBRUARY 2013 —MONTH 12 of our 50 year project

The first of Tony’s two picnic benches for Lost Gardeners in the Central Planthouse

 

 

PREPARING 2013 POTATO PLOTS FOR PLANTING

The first digging of the new plots beside the West Vine House (where Stuart Macintyre tended those prized tomatoes in the 1950s:— see Lost Garden Story) is now nearly finished and hand weeding is in progress.  Charlotte, Cara and Maris Peer will be our main varieties this year, with smaller quantities of Golden Wonder, Pink Fir Apple and 15 other organic varieties featured in the LOST GARDEN POTATO DAYS at Penicuik Town Hall every Saturday during February and March

 

HORSE LOGGING AT THE LOST GARDEN?

With Caitlin and Rab Erskine we’ve been exploring the possibility of using Cob horse Angel of

Innerleithen’s Homestead Horselogging Company to help us clear some of the Lost Garden trees..

 

 

Preparation of biodynamic redcurrant and organic vegetable beds in Eve’s plot at the west end of the upper terrace

The West Peach House once stood here at left, the structure of the West Plant House as in the background

 

WEST PLANT HOUSE RESTORATION?

The West Plant House was newer than the original 1875 glasshouses at the

Lost Garden  --it was an 1895 replacement by specialists Mackenzie & Moncur.

Unlike the others, the structure still stands today, but only just.

 

 

Chris Scotland of Gogar Cabinetworks is to look at the task of how we might restore

this timber structure (The West Plant House) over the summer months if possible.

 

POTATO DAYS 2013

Saturday seed Potato days through February and March

from Saturday 9 February from 10 till 2 in Penicuik Town Hall

Last year in our first six months at the Lost Garden we grew over 120kg of LADY BALFOUR, BRITISH QUEEN  and DESIREE varieties and made seed available to local growers.  This year with more of the Lost Garden under cultivation and rotation we plan grow at least three times as much.  This year we’ve been sharing 20 varieties of our organic seed purchases with enthusiasts in a series of ORGANIC SEED POTATO DAYS on February and March Saturdays in Penicuik Town Hall.  We start with:   AMBO. ARRAN VICTORY,  BAMBINO,  CARA, CASABLANCA,  CHARLOTTE,  COLLEEN,  GOLDEN WONDER,  HUNTER,  LINDA,  MARIS PEER,  ORLA,  PINK FIR APPLE,  RECORD,  REMARKA,  ROBINTA,  SARPO MIRA,  SETANTA,  TRIXIE  &  VALOR. -Don’t miss this chance to see and buy organic seed, plus 2 special extra not-yet-organic varieties. PARU and RED EMMALIE

See some details of each variety in our 2013 Potato Day booklet : www.lostgarden.co.uk/potato/days2013

 

February 3 2013: Lost Garden walking tour

(2pm from Estates Carlops Road Carpark on first Sunday of every month)

 

JANUARY 2013

Preparing ground for new plantings

Architects & engineers tour the garden

 

In January we were delighted to show the Lost Garden to Andy Davey, principal of architects Simpson & Brown, who are consulting on restorations at Penicuik House and Rosslyn Chapel.  Andy was responsible for the award-winning visitor centre at Arbroath Abbey, for advising on restoration at Poltimore House , Devon and his firm is consulted on brick garden structures at Elvaston, Derby.  “I thoroughly enjoyed my tour of the walled garden this afternoon –it exceeded all my expectations! I think this is such an exciting and worthwhile initiative.. As I said, we would be very keen to help you get started with this long term project..”

 

January saw the first of what we hope will be many working visits to the Garden.

Beeslack School brought some senior pupils in its horticulture and estate management skills-for-work program,

and Dave Alcorn brought the Conservation Volunteers.

 

January 5,6 and 12

Lost Garden story exhibition, Penicuik Town Hall

January 6: Lost Garden walking tour

(2pm from Estates Carlops Road Carpark on first Sunday of every month)

 

CHRISTMAS 2012

£1500-worth of Christmas Trees cut and supplied from the Garden

 

AUTUMN 2012: SPEND PART OF A

LOST WEEKEND

 WITH THE CLEARANCE TEAM

Jim Menigall and team have been clearing more unwanted trees north and south of the Great Hothouse Wall and Jim has also brought along pallets for stacking bricks.

If you can spare some time (just a few hours) on Friday 19, Saturday 20 or Sunday 21October  between 10 am and 3 pm to help tidy up downtakings of trees or palleting all the dropped bricks that are to be saved (60 per pallet), there is lots to be done. Bring gloves!

We are collecting stocks of useable wood from the downtakings and Peter and Mitch have been making a long dry hedge from the sticks and twigs to protect and shelter the west side of the top garden.

Plus we hope to start the Fruit Tree fence down the Grand Staircase to the left, to be ready for Tony's cordon plantings in the cold season.

 

Come and join us. ALL HANDS WELCOME  --SEE YOU THERE says JIM.

 

Dave Alcorn of The Conservation Volunteers has been in touch about working with us at the Lost Garden in future

Bruce Joyce, Landscaper, has given us a first estimate for rabbit-proof fencing either side of the Upper Terrace

 

Our next Lost Garden planning meetings onsite and in town will be on Wednesday 31 November, Gardeners onsite party on 3 November and Walking Tour on 4 October.

Dougie, Roger K and others meet MSP Christine Grahame to talk about the Lost Garden on 7 November

 

Speak to Roger K about the Lost Garden anytime at 01968 677854 or 07726 862850

 

OPEN DAY SUNDAY 7 OCTOBER

Roger K took the monthly walk around the garden for visitors from the Penicuik House Carlops Road car park at 2pm.

 

OPENING UP THE LIGHT

CLEARANCE TEAM PROGRESS

Thursday 4 October saw a work party clear much of the space readyfor Kelman and drain-digging at the north access side of the site.Dougie and Jim had already done a lot to remove the damp shady growth which has choked our buildings and access area above the north end of the Lost Garden.     Now the sun can shine again!

 

This follows the last planning meeting onsite and back in town on 3 October attended by Shirley, Mitch, Dougie, Jim, PeterC, Norma, Daniel, RogerK, Linda, RogerH, Tony, JaneK and helper Anna from Singapore.

 

 

DOORS OPEN DAY at the Lost Garden of Penicuik was warm and overcast, and saw over 50 visitors touring the Garden in no less than five walking groups, with three times that number at the Trust’s other Open Doors Day exhibition in the Cowan Institute (Penicuik Town Hall).  Garden visitors included the grandson of the Wilsons who worked the gardens all through the 1920s and 30s, and granddaughters of Mackenzie & Moncur, the Edinburgh hothouse suppliers.  Two people remembered their time at Girl Guide camps on the Lost Garden terrace in the 1960s and 70s.

 

ALL OUR POTATOES HARVESTED & SOLD

With blight in prospect after national alarms and a change from soaking rain to damp mornings of warm weather, we’ve harvested our potatoes in the first full week of August.  They were available bagged by the kilo at £1.60 in our three organic varieties and have now all gone.

BRITISH QUEEN, our oldest variety, was introduced in 1894 as a cross between Paterson’s Victoria  and Old Blue Don.  A great heritage potato,  British Queen is the most prone of our three varieties to blight so it was a priority for us to get it out of the ground and on to your table as fast as we could.  Smallish but very tasty, the flesh is white and floury. 

DÉSIRÉE,  our last potato to be planted out late this spring, has come along well in the rich LOST GARDEN earth.  It was introduced in 1962, just a handful of seasons before the Lost Garden began its long slumber.  Distinctively pink-skinned and cream-fleshed with good taste, it’s half way between waxy and floury and so lends itself to all sorts of ways of cooking.

LADY BALFOUR, the variety whose name honours the indefatigable Eve Balfour who inspired the Soil Association in the forties and fifties, has had the most benefit from the LOST GARDEN ground since we planted it first of all this year. A creamy colour, with good keeping qualities and a taste that improves with age, this is the quintessential organic variety.

 

All over Britain this season, potatoes were blighted as warmth has followed weirdly-wet weather.     Here at the LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK, using well-loved organic varieties, the best seed from Andrew Skea, Scotland’s key supplier (see below), traditional organic growing techniques, watchful husbandry  and early lifting to keep our tubers out of trouble, we’ve been able to harvest the earth’s essential goodness.  The yields may be small -much smaller than usual- but we’ve deliberately avoided the current potato management practices used elsewhere which rely heavily on multiple fungicide applications (up to 20 per season) for disease control.

About our bags…     We bagged in simple paper, with a sturdy outer paper-handled carrier, all supplied from Penicuik by Cameron Reith at Puddock Bags in Eastfield Drive. They lasted well, carried more inner bags if needed, and some people brought them back for refills.

                                                                   sorting an early batch of British Queen

STATISTICS FOR HARVEST COMPLETE AS AT 8 SEPTEMBER 2012

LADY BALFOUR: Harvested 50kg BRITISH QUEEN: Harvested 39kg DESIREE: Harvested 31kg   TOTAL:  Harvested 120kg

Lost Garden potato costs and revenue:   seed £42   bags £24   income £192   net £126

Trust’s one-off site lease costs roughly £3,500 (less grant support £750) Trust’s Lost Garden loss now around £2,600

 

We meet a demand for good but imperfect produce with our Waste Not Want Not range

Labels from the Waste Not Want Not range

Estimate from Waste Not Want Not potatoes (£7)

 

 

PENICUIK’S COMMUNITY FOOD PROJECT

LOST GARDEN  LATEST NEWS

POTATOES GO IN FROM THURSDAY 12 APRIL

This was the scene in the Lost Garden after a Wednesday work afternoon with Roma and Roger as the estate bell rings five, ready for Mitch to supervise first plantings from that Thursday onwards.

Newly-dug garden ground is being improved with well-rotted horse manure from Joyce Kent’s East Lothian base at Macmerry. Joyce is Group Instructor at Thornton Rose Ride-Ability Group at Rosewell and has been donating sackloads and trailer-loads to the Lost Garden Project

MORE PLANTING IN MAY

See below how our western boundary was cleared in June by the Head Forester

ALL THREE VARIETIES BLOOMING IN JULY

Planning

The end-August planning meeting outside in-situ was attended by Roger and Shirley and inside in Penicuik by Jess, Stef, Roger, Caroline, Katie, Peter, Vito, Ronja, Ulla, Tony, Norma and Mitch.

 

We visited the Royal Botanic Garden of Edinburgh for induction on Wednesday 5 September (2pm Hope Gateway)and were shown the impressively maintained growing plots, polytunnel, fruit bushes and Dyers Garden by Jenny Faulkes.

 

Growing

Until harvesting week in early August, our potatoes were all very large, all flowered, healthy looking and green as shown in the pictures above.

The three potato varieties were distinct on the plot: Lady Balfour, British Queen, Desiree.

As the potatoes were harvested we replaced them with broccoli, leeks and other crops.

 

The bed between the potatoes and the back of the Sabbath School wall is now planted up with

1 broad beans –these were harvested on 30 September

2 spinach

3 beetroot

a few parsley plants and some spring onions have gone in too.

Some anti bird nets have gone over some of the plants but we will need more.

Fruit bushes have produced a small crop of blackcurrants.

Further along at the plots just west of the Central Glasshouse, some clearing and digging has been done to get ready for more planting in the autumn and a big potato patch for next spring.

 

We think that all the carrot and parsley seeds which were sown in the last glasshouse bed, floated away in the deluges. Nothing appeared there at all, even after a second sowing.

 

Contacts and Offers

Jessica and Stef have joined our group, and will help us select varieties for organic growing and construct some of the things we need around the garden.  Mitch has donated wooden windows for cold frames.

 

Stella Rankin of Kevock Garden Plants phoned to offer to help us with planting and growing advice and to host fund-raising events at their Nurseries in Kevock Road, Lasswade. This is a super offer.

http://www.kevockgarden.co.uk/

 

We have enjoyed a first work-session with the Edinburgh-based Good Wood project

http://www.newcaledonianwoodlands.org/projects/goodwood.php

 The team arrived from Edinburgh in their minibus.  The visit was very successful from our point of view.  We got some good digging done, and the group will be returning to the Lost Garden at intervals.

We are in touch with the Edinburgh-based Green Team about similar project visits

 

 

Roger Kelly met Army Welfare who are considering some possible joint work –they have yet to reconnect.

 

We were offered a big free shed to be uplifted and re-roofed etc. to house a temporary toilet. The shed had to be gratefully declined in view of roof and floor condition, dismantling and transport.  Two other free sheds have been brought onsite by ready Paul for assembly

 

Caroline Maciver has made contact with the volunteer organisations in Midlothian and is well on the way to putting us all (not just the Garden but the Trust) on the volunteer map so that potential volunteers and gardeners can easily find us.

 

Caroline and Jane Mac are going to apply for a grant to cover the cost of rabbit-proof fencing.

 

Mitch has bought a lost garden strimmer and is looking after it on our behalf.  It was paid for using part of our tool grant. (NHS Scotland)

So far we have sold plants and planters to the value of approx  £50, Lost Garden Blackcurrant Jam to the value of £20, and Lost Garden Potatoes to the value of £192.

 

In addition to potatoes and other produce which can be seen at the Town Hall Saturday Open House (10 till 2) and at Valleyfield House Saturday Food Market (10 till 12), Plants are available in aid of the Lost Garden at the Saturday Open House. Donations 30p - £1.50 per plant will be gratefully accepted.

 

There will be a dedicated money box and a book to keep a record of sales, donations and expenditure in the Town Hall

 

Katie and Caroline have made and laminated some large colourful plant labels which have been put in place.

 

 

Other Reclamation work

 

Florance and Rik continue to work on the fountain

and the impressive input and output of the supply that serves it

 

Some of the main Lost Garden axis is being trimmed –through the trees from fountain to steps low branches removed by Rik, and from fountain to gate strimmed by Mitch, with some of the 500 daffodils donated by Dobbies now planted.

 

Since the rhododendron was removed by the Head Forester leaving the garden more exposed it was decided that Tony Dore  would plant artichokes which grow tall. But the plants didn’t survive the jaws of their predators!

 

Tony (who looks after the orchard at the Bush Estate) is taking charge of our project to plant fruit trees to be trained along the walls of the garden. We should be able to grow apples, pears and plums –these were grown here successfully in days gone by.

 

The whole length of side path (the West Ramp) from above top to bottom has been cleared revealing a stone channel which must have been both drainage and a roadway to wheel barrows or lead draft horses  to connect the 2 parts of the garden. We have irises and a useful water supply. It  The East Ramp is now getting the same treatment

 

The compost bins are up to 3 now and look great. They are getting filled.

 

We  just need people really! It can be lonely up there and it is great when we get a good turnout. It has always seemed warmer and more sheltered than the rest of Penicuik: those garden designers knew what they were doing.

 

Phone Jane K (01968 677854) for or with any more information. or to join in discussion with suggestions.

 

Our next monthly meeting will be on Wednesday 3rd October at the Lost Garden at about 6.30 pm and then at 7.30pm at Valleyfield House, 17 High St, at 7.30pm

Our next Lost Garden walking tour is on the first Sunday, 7th October at 2pm from the Penicuik Estate Carlops Road Car Park. 

 

 

ACE: WELL-KENT LOCAL HORSE MADE GOOD

Here is Ace who in the 1990s used to overwinter on his own just up the hill from the Lost Garden, alone on the moor at the head of the Carlops Road. In those long-ago days he seemed old and sad and abandoned, just like the Garden. Yet now Ace is recognised as a horse with real character.  He’s just won the British Horse Society Equine Personality of the Year. For the last 12 years he’s given joy to disabled riders of all ages, passing on a sense of achievement and confidence. His start in life was as a logging horse on the Pentland Hills and he joined the team at Thornton Rose in its Braidwood RDA days in 1999. Ace works three days a week and has rarely missed a day. He has the gift of reassuring other horses with his calming and steady influence on rides and in the field. It’s good to be valued at last! Ace’s story is an inspiration for this Garden in so many ways.

 

 

ANDREW SKEA POTATOES FOR THE LOST GARDEN

The Lost Garden’s potatoes have been grown from organic seed from Andrew Skea at Auchterhouse. Andrew has this year become the President of the British Potato Trades Association –congratulations!

 

Our potatoes were chatted before planting out in the newly-dug northwest plot at E (see the ABC below) just below the remains of the West Pear House. The ground has been dressed with well rotted horse-manure-based compost (2 trailer loads and 44 bags brought here from Joyce Kent so far) and (where needed) with potash gathered by Mitch from Pete’s smouldered nettle roots.

 

  

International helpers Malte and Rike from near Hamburg hard at

work on Penicuik’s Lost Garden in all weathers.

PLANTING IN ALL WEATHERS

While Peter clears ground up ahead, international help-exchange helper

Vito (Tsz ho Kuok) from Hong Kong digs to prepare for our next food

crop. Vito was determined to finish the plot in spite of the rain.

 

Keeping up the pace are keen local volunteers of all ages and a few young help-exchange helpers from overseas. Our potato plantings this year began with LADY BALFOUR. Scottish bred for an organic early Maincrop, Lady Balfour is named after Eve Balfour the Soil Association founder and has high yields and very good disease resistance. Oval potatoes with splashes of pink they have firm cream flesh and a mild flavour.  Lady Balfour was followed by plantings of BRITISH QUEEN and then by DESIREE into May as more freshly dug area became available. 

Other varieties like BAMBINO and ISLE OF JURA and special planting requests may follow on other parts of the Lost Garden in future years.

 

FIRST FRUIT, FLOWERS AND HERBS

First donated soft fruit plantings of Gooseberry and Jostaberry (blackcurrant-gooseberry) have gone in beside the surviving blackberry bush in Eve’s Garden. By May the rabbits had been at them already. Still, we got enough to raise £20 for The Lost Garden from our Blackcurrant Jam.  Flowers and herbs are being planted on either side of the Central hothouse steps, with some flowers inside where the invasive trees have left room.

 

DEVELOPMENT TRUST BACKS THE LOST GARDEN

Meeting in Penicuik on 11 April the managing committee of Penicuik Community Development Trust backed the encouraging progress so far on the Lost Garden project and endorsed plans to acquire Penicuik’s Old Post Office and Pen-y-Coe Press in Bridge Street to maintain a popular local business and give the Trust and The Lost Garden a town centre base to show our work and trade from during the week when the Town Hall is being used by others. Read more about these plans on www.makers.org.uk/penicuik/press

 

 

MOSS AND LICHEN NOT TO BE LOST

We’ve been happy to clear mosses and lichens away when cleaning steps and making them safe.  We’re trying not to clear all the moss and lichen from every other stone surface though. And we want to hang on to moss and lichen encrusted trees.  After all, these growths are a sign of the good health of the lost garden and a big part of its beauty and charm as the photographs show. A lichen display featured in the Spring 2012 Science Festival in Penicuik Town Hall.

 

   

ADAM AND EVE -THE LOST GARDEN A.B.C.

Looking at the length of the upper terrace where the greenhouses were, we’ve identified five distinct areas from A to E running from right to left at the top of the Lost Garden’s main steps. Longwall glasshouses ran through all five areas, and extra glasshouses projected southwards at B, C and D.

 

A is for Adam, the symbolic figure celebrated a century and a half ago by Penicuik’s Thistle Lodge of Free Gardeners, originally a sister lodge of Auchterarder. It’s also for Auldjo Jamieson, the Edinburgh Accountant so much involved with the Lost Garden’s earliest years –read about him in the Lost Garden Story. A is also for the Alders which grow at this damp easternmost Penicuik end of the terrace. Alders were used for charcoal burning which started in the Lost Garden in the nineteen seventies.  Rotten decades-old sacks of charcoal can be found strewn among the Alders in areas A and B.

The base of the eastern peninsular greenhouse lies in area B which runs westbound from there. B is for the Billies, father and son, Lakeland charcoal burners made famous by Arthur Ransome.

 Area C surrounds the main Central Conservatory, once the biggest and tallest hothouse in the garden. Here is our main Congregating area for special occasions, without permanent covering as yet! On either side of the approach we have planted one small bed of flowers and another of herbs.

Next along is Area D with its prolific Daffodils. D is for Dennis, the local bricklayer and contractor John Dennis was born in 1842 as Dennis Murphy.  Here is the third and western peninsular greenhouse, rebuilt more solidly in the 1890s.  Perhaps because of this, its structure still stands for us to restore, but currently it is too Derelict and Dangerous to go inside.

Area E is the last at the country end of the terrace (a brass letter E was found here at the start of the project). As by far the easiest area for us to start with, it’s our garden of Eden dedicated to Eve Balfour and her potatoes. We’re giving the old blackcurrant bush by the wall here-where the Peach House once stood- some gooseberries and other soft fruit for company if the rabbits will let us!  

These areas A to E are on the upside of the terrace. But each segment also has a downside parterre held back by the retaining wall from the lower square walled area between the foot of the long steps and the main gates. Apart from clearing and cleaning the steps themselves, we’re not going near this parterre for the moment.

 At the foot of the long steps, the very large walled square Kitchen Garden divides naturally into four big quadrants around the fountain. F is in the northeast from the fountain to the fallen brick face of the terrace retaining wall. G is in the northwest towards the garden’s tiny gas works which still stands just beyond the wall.  H is in the southeast up to the heraldic gate and I in the southwest points into the prevailing wind.

Back at the top end of the garden, above the growing areas and on the other side of the hundred-and-twenty-foot greenhouse wall was the long single-storey range of garden buildings, now mostly roofless.  Left to right along its frontage was the Mushroom House (backing area A); Bothy, vennel and the rooms of the gardener’s house.  Later converted to forestry offices, this was where water and electricity came in and the inside loo was situated (backing area B); Central entrance and main workhall (later woodworking studio) with temporary sleeping space above (backing Area C); Former furnace and hot rooms now burned out and demolished (backing area D); Former Garden Sabbath School now workstore area (backing area E). For more about how all these things came to be, see the Lost Garden Story.

 

 PUTTING THE MEGALITHS BACK IN PLACE

Displaced large long stones lie across the land we are planting with potatoes in area E, like the dried fern covered mass in the middle of this picture. They are in the way. We need to move them a short distance back to their proper place. They once formed the outer base of the longwall Eve greenhouse (once the Peach House) which we want to restore one day.  Moving these megaliths is a challenge –a major test of joint effort, strength and ingenuity.  Can you help?

 

LOST IN THE ARCHIVES

Our researchers at the National Archives and in Penicuik are finding more about the history of the Lost Garden and the involvement of George Auldjo Jamieson. Join in and keep up with the emerging story of the Lost Garden here on our special webpage at

www.makers.org.uk/penicuik/lostgardenstory

or come to the Saturday Open House sessions at Penicuik Town Hall (10am-2pm) where there’s usually Lost Garden display alongside the Trust’s other exhibitions.

The lost garden plan of 1873 has now been found  (click here for pdf view)

 

 

LOST IN THE PENICUIK CINEMA

Weekly cinemagoers enjoying Martin Scorsese’s Hugo on the Trust’s big screen in Penicuik Town Hall on 22 April were delighted to see the re-creation of Georges Melies’ glass film studio in Paris -a building not far removed from our own Lost Garden hothouse. It fell apart in front of our eyes!  See it and some of the other brilliant Hugo effects on YouTube here  (See upcoming Penicuik cinema here.)

 

WE NEED YOUR HELP

both in the Garden and behind the scenes.

Digging, planting, shifting, clearing, cleaning, identifying, researching, partnering. And we need more tools, thermos flasks, plantpots, manure, fencing, bricks, gravel, paving slabs, old carpets, and publicity -for our growing plans and restoration.  Give us a call or come to the Saturday Open House in Penicuik Town Hall. Our current task list is at www.makers.org.uk/penicuik/lostgardentasklist 

 

Grand Staircase in March and April –what a difference a month makes!

LET’S SHOW YOU THE LOST GARDEN

and what we’re doing to bring it back to production and a sustainable future. You’re welcome to join our regular work parties but if you want to look first we can give you a tour. On the first Sunday of every month we’ll show you round if you turn up at 2pm to join the group in the Penicuik House Estate car park on Carlops Road (just up the hill from the Spear Gate). We’ll walk you over to the Lost Garden. 

 

OVER 50 JOINED IN LOST GARDEN OPEN DAY ON 6 MAY 2012

On 6 May over 50 people of all ages came to celebrate the first few weeks of this 50 year project and some of the planting and restoration work we’ve done so far. The roofless Central Conservatory was our meeting place, prepared for the occasion. See Ruth Strauss facebook pictures here.  

 

LACK OF A LOST GARDEN LOO

Remember, there are no toilet facilities yet! We are looking to provide them in future along these lines perhaps –see product here and local example here!

 

THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK

 

Go to www.makers.org.uk/penicuik/lostgarden for lots more

PICTURES OF THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK

THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK

THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK

 

FEBRUARY 2012: THE PROJECT BEGINS

At the end of February 2012, after three years of negotiations with the owners, the Trust began a long-term lease on the great brick-built Victorian Walled Garden at Penicuik Estate.

 

It’s the first step in what we see as a 50 year project for food production and historic garden restoration.

 

For images of the Lost Garden in the years since its creation in the 1870s www.makers.org.uk/penicuik/lostgarden  

For the background story of The Lost Garden see www.lostgarden.co.uk/story

For some of the early background to our restoration project see www.makers.org.uk/penicuik/food

For our inaugural prospectus back in 2009 see www.lostgarden.co.uk/prospectus2009

For our current Town Centre ideas for the Pen-y-Coe Press see www.kosmoid.net/penicuik/press

For the restoration project of our MapaScotland colleagues see  www.makers.org.uk/mapascotland

 

Jonathan Martin Whitfield, MB ChB, FRCP(C) one of America’s leading pediatricians and a specialist in neonatal care, talks of his childhood in the midst of the Lost Garden www.kosmoid.net/penicuik/whitfield

 

THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK

THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK

THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK

THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK

THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK -E

THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK –E,D,C

THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK C

THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK

 

 

THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK -D

THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK

 

THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK

The walled garden restoration began in 2012.

Find out more about Penicuik Trust projects at the weekly Open House in Penicuik Town Hall

On-the-spot exhibitions, on-the-spot hands-on crafts sessions for kids and adults, onsite visits and more…

Penicuik Community Development Trust is responsible for the Lost Garden of Penicuik, Penicuik Food Project, Penicuik Open House, Penicuik Cinema and the Bankmill Project. The Trust is a charitable company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland with company number 380626 and OSCR charity number SC O37990 and Trustee Directors Roger Kelly (chair), Roger Hipkin (secretary 20A John St. Penicuik EH26 8A ), Jane MacKintosh (treasurer), Dave Stokes, Mose Hutchinson and Penny Wooding, forming part of a Managing committee with Anne-Ruth Strauss, Bill Fearnley, Caroline Maciver, Chantal Geoghegan, Chris Langdale, Daniel Baigrie, Doreen Gillon, Jane Kelly, Katie Sydes, Lynn Niven, Marianne Cortes, Marjory Bisset, Mitch Lewis, Peter Coutts, Simon Duffy, Simon Fraser, Ulla Hipkin, elected annually at the Trust's AGM.   Paid-up Membership of over 200;  Patrons: Ian Macdougall, Gerda Stevenson, Colonel Edward Cowan.  Trust official Website www.penicuikcdt.org.uk The Trust is a Member of Development Trusts Association Scotland (DTAS) takes part in Doors Open Day, and works with Penicuik Community Council, Midlothian Council, Midlothian Voluntary Action, the Midlothian Growing Ideas Partnership (including Midlothian Garden Services, Mayfield & Easthouses Development Trust, and other garden and food projects in Midlothian associated with the Federation of City Farms and Community Gardens), and the Mapa Scotland restoration of the Great Polish Map of Scotland at Eddleston, and supported the papemaking tercentenary led by Penicuik Historical Society.  There are personal and mutually supportive links with Penicuik Community, Sport & Leisure Foundation, Penicuik Community Arts Association, the Penicuik House Project, the Scottish Civic Trust and the Saltire Society, with community groups and trusts in Aberfeldy, Broughty Ferry, Gorebridge and Moffat, with Penicuik’s twin town at L’Isle-sur-la Sorgue, Vaucluse, Provence, with Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, Quebec and with the Papeterie St-Armand in Montreal.  

 

WEBSITE LINKS:

PICTURES OF THE LOST GARDEN

 

STORY OF THE LOST GARDEN

–how the Lost Garden of Penicuik came to happen

 

 

LOST GARDEN POTATO DAYS IN PENICUIK TOWN HALL 2013

 

 

www.makers.org.uk/penicuik/food

–how the Penicuik Food Project in the Lost Garden came to happen

 

PENICUIK SATURDAY ORGANIC & FAIRTRADE MARKET

–entirely non-profit and run by local volunteers since 1990

TAKING ON THE PRESS

 –ideas for Pen-Y-Coe Press & Old Post Office, Bridge Street Penicuik 

BANK MILL PROJECT LATEST

-exciting plans to show Penicuik’s papermaking heritage go on hold

. 

Campaign to restore General Maczek’s GREAT POLISH MAP OF SCOTLAND

-our forgotten international attraction at nearby Eddleston, the biggest outdoor relief map in the world 

 

PENICUIK HOUSE PRESERVATION TRUST

 

PICTURES OF BIELD COMMUNITY WALLED GARDEN, PERTHSHIRE

 

PILLAR AND MOON : THE GRAND ENTRANCE TO NOWHERE

 

Penicuik Community Development Trust

 Saturday Open House in the Town Hall:

Some of the 100 or so Penicuik Open House weekly displays

KITTY FYFFE’S POSTCARDS

PENICUIK CO-OP

HEAT & LIGHT

OLD TOOLS

TOM ADAMS TOWN PLANNER FROM CARLOPS TO NEW YORK

ROBERT NASMYTH AND PENICUIK’S CORNBANK DESIGN

THE COWAN PAPER ADVERTISEMENTS OF 1944

JOHN DENNIS AND THE ESKBRIDGE BRICKWORKS

THE COWAN ARTISTS OF 1944

DEMOLITION OF VALLEYFIELD MILL IN 1980

 

Penicuik Community Development Trust a message from the chair, October 2012

SATURDAY OPEN HOUSE. The exhibitions put on for Midlothian Doors Open Day in the Town Hall with Penicuik Historical Society were a success and we look forward to more cooperative ventures.  Our Mars–Curiosity exhibition was transferred to the Royal Observatory of Edinburgh at their request and is being put up at Penicuik High School. On October 6 we show the first part of an exhibition of photographs of Tibet and Mount Everest taken by Alan Ward, who leads disabled groups on Himalayan treks. The second part is on November 3.  October 13 is a display Favourite Children’s Books, with some best-loved examples to pick up and read, and the children’s felting group will be making cuddly cuckoos.  October 20 gives an opportunity to meet the Penicuik Family History Group and discover more about your ancestors. On October 27 you can find out about the talks and groups run locally by U3A and their opportunities for learning, education and leisure activities for people over 50. Apart from the exhibitions at the Trust’s Saturday Open House, just come for a chat over coffee and our famous home baking. We open every week in the Town Hall from 10 am and close at 2 pm,

POSTCARD FOR PENICUIK. The latest competition to find images for more of the Trust’s Penicuik postcards attracted over 50 entries and was judged by members of the public and two professional photographers. The winner was a composite image The Burgh of Penicuik

PEN-Y-COE PRESS. We expect to take over the buildings by the end of the month. Although there’s likely to be a reduced service while we take stock and get organised, we aim to keep many aspects of his business going, particularly the sale of paper-related products and artists’ materials and a reprographics service. In the future, we plan to add a tourist information centre, bookshop and heritage displays, as well as papermaking and printing craft workshops and other visitor comforts if we can. Discussions have started with Midlothian Council and others about how to use its visitor potential to support our town and town centre.

THE GREAT POLISH MAP OF SCOTLAND. Recognising the potential of the huge outdoor model of Scotland at Black Barony Castle in Eddleston as a unique local attraction, I began the campaign to restore the Great Map with an exhibition in Penicuik Town Hall in 2008.  Last month, the efforts of volunteers were rewarded with listed monument status, a debate in the Scottish Parliament, and the support of the Scottish Government and Polish Consul-General.  Restoration of this amazing resource can now go forward on a positive footing.  We plan to have another exhibition in Penicuik soon, look for our pages on the Great Polish Map of Scotland on the internet meantime.

PENICUIK CINEMA. With one of our largest audiences ever for The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, and then showing the new Ken Loach Angels Share only days after its release, Penicuik Cinema’s superb weekly programme is now in full swing. Ewan McGregor, Emily Blunt and Kristin Scott Thomas star in British Comedy of the Year Salmon Fishing in the Yemen (2011, Cert 12A) on October 7. My Week with Marilyn (2012, Cert 15) is on October 14 -it won Michelle Williams a 2012 Golden Globe. The original version of The Wicker Man (1973, Cert 15) will be screened on October. It features Christopher Lee, Edward Woodward and Britt Ekland in pagan rites in the wilds of Galloway. The original Swedish version of Stig Larsson’s millennium trilogy opens with The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2009, Cert 18). November 4 takes us back half a century with Stanley Kubrick’s cult Cold-War comedy Dr Strangelove (1964, Cert PG), in which Peter Sellers carries three roles as American president, Nazi rocket engineer and an RAF liaison officer.  More of our future programme is on www.kosmoid.net/penicuik/cinema Doors open at Penicuik Town Hall at 7 pm; films start of 7.30 pm. Adult tickets are £5 at the door. Where suitable permit, tickets for accompanied children under 13 are £3. 

AT THE LOST GARDEN OF PENICUIK  the Trust’s band of volunteers continues to make progress clearing undergrowth, exploring water features, restoring buildings and growing crops. Although only onsite with our long lease to restore the Lost Garden since March, we successfully grew a pioneer crop of 120 kilos of organic potatoes for the Penicuik market and showed visitors this amazing place at this year’s Doors Open Day. We’ll soon be taking the first steps in restoring apple growing  Join us, it’s a lot of fun, ring me at 677854 or find us on Facebook.  Walking tours are on the first Sunday of each month and start at 2pm from the Penicuik House Car Park, Carlops Road.  See www.makers.org.uk/penicuik/lostgardenlatest  and www.makers.org.uk/penicuik/lostgardenstory

 

The Trust is people like you determined to stop the rot and build real assets for the future to give our town life for a new generation.  Where there’s a will there will always be a way. 

 

Penicuik Community Development Trust is responsible for the Lost Garden of Penicuik, Penicuik Food Project, Penicuik Open House, Penicuik Cinema and the Bankmill Project. The Trust is a charitable company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland with company number 380626 and OSCR charity number SC O37990 and Trustee Directors Roger Kelly (chair), Roger Hipkin (secretary 20A John St. Penicuik EH26 8A ), Jane MacKintosh (treasurer), Dave Stokes, Mose Hutchinson and Penny Wooding, forming part of a Managing committee with Anne-Ruth Strauss, Bill Fearnley, Caroline Maciver, Chantal Geoghegan, Chris Langdale, Daniel Baigrie, Doreen Gillon, Jane Kelly, Katie Sydes, Lynn Niven, Marianne Cortes, Marjory Bisset, Mitch Lewis, Peter Coutts, Simon Duffy, Simon Fraser, Ulla Hipkin, elected annually at the Trust's AGM.   Paid-up Membership of over 200;  Patrons: Ian Macdougall, Gerda Stevenson, Colonel Edward Cowan.  Trust official Website www.penicuikcdt.org.uk The Trust is a Member of Development Trusts Association Scotland (DTAS) takes part in Doors Open Day, and works with Penicuik Community Council, Midlothian Council, Midlothian Voluntary Action, the Midlothian Growing Ideas Partnership (including Midlothian Garden Services, Mayfield & Easthouses Development Trust, and other garden and food projects in Midlothian associated with the Federation of City Farms and Community Gardens), and the Mapa Scotland restoration of the Great Polish Map of Scotland at Eddleston, and supported the papemaking tercentenary led by Penicuik Historical Society.  There are personal and mutually supportive links with Penicuik Community, Sport & Leisure Foundation, Penicuik Community Arts Association, the Penicuik House Project, the Scottish Civic Trust and the Saltire Society, with community groups and trusts in Aberfeldy, Broughty Ferry, Gorebridge and Moffat, with Penicuik’s twin town at L’Isle-sur-la Sorgue, Vaucluse, Provence, with Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, Quebec and with the Papeterie St-Armand in Montreal.