BOOTS & SHOES

Penicuik Town Hall from 10am-2pm Saturday November 3rd 2007

part of the Penicuik Community Development Trust Open House programme

featuring

GALLOWAY CLOGS

LASTS for making and mending shoes

AFRICA BOOTS

RUBBER WADERS

 with metal tackets to give a grip on smooth slippy pebbles on the river bottom

MOON BOOTS

SKATES used on Penicuik Low Pond

Children's Foot Health Register

and much more!

 

 

Children's Foot Health Register

Centre of excellence for children's shoe fitting:

Young & Co.,  Eastgate, Peebles

Young & Co kindly lent a B fitting Start-Rite children’s shoe.  Fifty years ago children’s (and adult) feet in this area were much narrower than they are today.

NORWICH SHOEMAKERS

 

SOMERSET SHOEMAKERS

 

WESTMORELAND SHOEMAKERS

NORWICH SHOEMAKERS

 

AT WELLINGTON REFORMATORY, PENICUIK 150 YEARS AGO

EDINBURGH STREET KIDS WERE TRAINED IN SHOEMAKING AND OTHER SKILLS TO PREPARE THEM FOR A WORKING LIFE IN CANADA OR AUSTRALIA

 

Reformatories and Industrial Schools

In 1836, on the Isle of Wight, Britain’s first reformatory was established at Parkhurst to train boys who were under the sentence of transportation for two to three years before their removal from the country. The Philanthropic Society established Redhill Reformatory in 1849 and soon others followed. However, it was not until 1854 that the British Government finally passed legislation to assist and accredit these institutions.

A child, under 14 years of age, could be sent to an Industrial School for begging, wandering, consorting with thieves or prostitutes or because the parents deemed him or her uncontrollable. If a child was found guilty of a more serious offence or was a repeat offender he or she was usually sent to a Reformatory School. Sometimes a single institution fulfilled both roles.  Both kinds of school gave basic education to the inmates and taught them a trade such as shoemaking, tailoring, wood chopping, carpentry and farming, for the boys and, cookery, laundry and house chores for the girls.

A British government report in 1884 stated that some 2,108 boys and 133 girls had already emigrated to the colonies from institutions in England, Scotland and Ireland.. In 1891 British legislation made it more difficult to emigrate the children and by the early 1900s it had all but ceased.

see The Golden Bridge: Young Immigrants to Canada, 1833-1939  by Marjorie Kohli

 

The Institutions in Scotland:

Glasgow had a Girls Reformatory in the city,  The Maryhill Industrial School for Girls, and out-of-town the East Chapelton Reformatory for girls from 1854

Paisley’s Kibble Institute (Kibble Reformatory) dates from 1859.

Perth had Fechney Industrial School at Wells Hill  for boys from 1864

 

Edinburgh had one of the most famous of these institutions, the out-of-town Wellington Reformatory for boys outside Penicuik. The old Wellington Inn was purchased and turned into a Reformatory to house 110 lads. It was certified in 1859. John Craster was appointed as manager. In time, emigration funds were provided by the “Old Boys” and one “Old Boy” became a director of the School.  The architect friend of Penicuik papermaker Sir John Cowan, F.T. Pilkington (who created buildings at Parkend, Kirkhill School, Penicuik South Kirk, Barclay Church), designed a new range of buildings for the Wellington Reformatory in 1874.

see The Golden Bridge: Young Immigrants to Canada, 1833-1939  by Marjorie Kohli

 

Advertisement on the front page of  The Scotsman June 5th 1882.

THE EMIGRANT'S FAREWELL

Farewell to bonnie Scotland! to the mountains and the glen,
The land of love and freedom of fair women and brave men.
The good ship now outspreads her wings to bear us o'er the foam
Far, far from
Caledonia and our Native Highland home.

Farewell to him who served me well with famous boots and shoes
A parting word of gratitude to him we can't refuse
His boots through many changing years have well adorned our feet
Enabling old and young to walk in ease and comfort sweet.

Farewell to friends and kinsfolk - shall we ever see them more?
Or shall our bones be laid to rest on yonder far off shore?
We know not - but we hope and trust we shall not seek in vain
For Scottish hearts both leal and true across th'Atlantic main.

Farewell Auld Scotland - it may prove a long and last adieu;
But though the glistening tear should dint our last fond look at you
Our heads are cool, are hearts are firm and we have for our feet
A stack of LECKIE'S BOOTS AND SHOES FROM 50 COCKBURN STREET.

JOSEPH LECKIE
CELEBRATED BOOT AND SHOE WAREHOUSE
50 COCKBURN STREET.
EDINBURGH

 

 

 

 

x-ray shoes

X-ray shoe fitting observation machine (Stirling Smith Gallery)

as used in most British shoeshops in the mid 20thcentury

Viewing screen for child users at front, adult users and 2 side observers on top

 

 

Children's Foot Health Register

Centres of excellence for children's shoe fitting in UK and Eire

Our Aim: The Healthy Growth and Development of Young Feet.

All Members of the Children's Foot Health Register are committed to the highest standard of shoe fitting for young, growing feet. To protect such standards members guarantee to provide comprehensive training for staff and offer children's shoes in whole and half sizes and in up to 4 width fittings.

FASCINATING FOOT FACTS

·    The average adult takes in excess of 18,000 steps a day and it's even more for kids.

·    Most feet walk about 70,000 miles in a lifetime - that's four times around the earth.

·    Leonardo da Vinci called the foot a masterpiece of engineering.

·    Each foot has 26 bones, 19 muscles, over 100 ligaments and thousands of nerve endings.

·    Every time your foot hits the floor when walking it's the equivalent of twice your body weight. Running increases this to up to three times your body weight.

·    The foot has 250,000 sweat glands releasing about a quarter pint of perspiration every day.

·    Around 70% of foot problems come from wearing the wrong footwear or ill-fitting shoes. The majority of these are caused by ill-fitting footwear worn as a child.

·    Over £30 million is spent annually on chiropody services for the over 60s and most of these foot problems can be attributed to badly fitting shoes or unsuitable footwear in childhood.

TIPS FOR TINY TOOTSIES

These tips will help any concerned parent make the right choices about family footcare and adhering to them will be a real investment for your child's future.

Foot Care for Your Baby:

A baby's foot is not simply a smaller version of an adult's. At birth the 26 bones that will eventually make up the adult foot are mostly cartilage making them pliable and therefore susceptible to damage. To allow your baby's feet to develop naturally without being distorted, always:

o        Keep bedclothes loose fitting and light so the feet are not restricted.

o        Encourage your baby to exercise its feet by kicking and similar actions. This will help develop the foot muscles.

Foot Care for Your Toddler and Young Child:

o        Don't force a child into walking. They will start when ready, which can be anytime between 10 and 18 months.

o        Encourage your child to walk barefoot indoors as this allows the foot to develop and strengthen.

o        Once walking is established, children are ready for their first shoes. Always ensure that shoes are purchased in a reputable shoe shop, where children's feet are measured and the fit of the shoes is checked by trained Shoe Fitters.

o        Inspect your child's feet regularly, at least every bath time, as children often can't feel any damage being done. Look for abnormalities such as cuts, breaks in the skin and any unusual changes in colour or temperature.

DO'S AND DON'TS FOR NEW PARENTS

DO..

o        Wait until your child is on its feet and attempting the first tottering steps before considering buying shoes. Then go to a shop with trained staff who will measure your child's feet for length and width.

o        Choose shoes that gives stability and protection to feet, which are still soft and vulnerable at this young age. An ideal shoe should be soft and flexible, with breathing leather uppers and a fully adjustable fastening for a snug fit.

o        Choose a shop that offers shoes in width fittings and half sizes and that has trained staff who can expertly fit them. Less than a third of children are "average" fitting so foot measurement and correct fitting are vital to a pair of feet.

o        Take your child back to the shop for a fitting check after about six to eight weeks. Feet grow, on average, two full sizes (18mm) a year until four or five years of age when growth starts to slow down. As this growth is intermittent, regular checks are essential and a good shoe shop will offer these free.

DON'T..

o        Put young children in socks or babygros that are too small for their feet. This could cause their toes to curl, which can result in permanent damage to the growing bones.

o        Buy synthetic socks or shoes as they won't allow your child's feet to breathe properly and this could lead to conditions such as athlete's foot. What's more, synthetic materials will only stretch so far, and the resulting pressure could again damage a child's growing foot.

TIPS FOR BACK TO SCHOOL

o        Back to school is the busiest time for shoe shops. If you can, shop early to avoid the worst of the queues and to have more choice.

o        Make sure your child is wearing the type of socks that they will be normally be wearing with their school shoes when you buy them. This will help ensure a good fit.

o        Measuring feet is only a guide. A good shoe shop will always check the fit of both shoes on the feet.

o        Choose a shoe that gives stability and protection to feet, which are still soft and vulnerable. An ideal shoe should be soft and flexible, with breathing leather uppers and a fully adjustable fastening for a snug fit.

o        Choose a shop that offers shoes in width fittings and half sizes and that has trained staff who can expertly fit them. Less than a third of children are 'average' fitting so foot measurement and correct fitting are vital to a pair of feet.

o        Fitted shoes have growing room to ensure good fit throughout the life of the shoe. It's not necessary to buy a larger shoe than one which is fitted. In fact, shoes that are too big can do as much damage as shoes that are too small and they look scruffy much more quickly.

o        After a summer in trainers or sandals school shoes will feel strange. Encourage your child to wear their new shoes for an hour or two around the house before the school term commences. On a normal school day a child wears shoes for around 10 hours and a little time to get used to new shoes before the first day of term is very helpful.

o        A good shoe shop will offer a free fitting check. For a school-age child this will be after 3-4 months and then as required until the shoes are outgrown. Most children of school age grow around a whole shoe size each year.

 

BOOTS & SHOES

Penicuik Town Hall from 10am-2pm Saturday November 3rd 2007

part of the Penicuik Community Development Trust Open House programme

  image © 1999 http://www.users.waitrose.com/~ianclare/lejog1.htm

 

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